Feb 26, 2013

Why are we building data centres? :: Articles :: Technology Decisions


You’d think that with the consolidation of computing driven by blade servers and virtualisation that the number and size of data centres would be shrinking. But the opposite is true.
Our thirst for computing power and storage is unquenchable. Less than a decade ago, each workload would run on its own server. Those servers consumed several rack units, meaning that many racks were needed for even moderately sized businesses.
Today, a 6RU unit can hold up to eight blades and each of those can run 20 or 30 virtual servers. That could have easily filled three or four full-size racks.
The problem is that while computing density is increasing, our desire is outpacing the ability to add more computing power. According to Ross Hammond, the director of Telecom Business for Emerson Network Power Australia and New Zealand, “The market is not slowing down, it’s compressing.”
This is why businesses are continuing to expand their data centres and add new ones rather than reduce.  With a shift to cloud computing, you could expect to be closing or reducing your data centre down but the reality is that the need to maintain systems on-site is not diminishing.
Part of the challenge is that businesses are operating in far more elastic environments. Depending on economic cycles, there are times when data centres aren’t fully utilised but spikes in activity mean that data centres need to be designed for periods of higher activity.
According to Hammond, there’s a very definite trend not only in the data centre infrastructure market but also the broader technology market: long-term crests and troughs have been replaced with shorter-term hikes and spikes.
While data centre utilisation is not at 100% - some sources suggesting that only about 60% of existing data centre capacity is being used - the compressed project cycles and requirements for increased computing and storage are outpacing the capacity to build new infrastructure even with the buffer of unused capacity.  Some estimates suggest that if we stopped adding data centre capacity globally today, we would run out of capacity in about nine months.
The other factor that’s driving the burgeoning growth of data centres is the desire to reduce network latency. Both Amazon and Rackspace have recently added data centres to address performance and data sovereignty concerns. But businesses are also doing the same.
“What we’re seeing points very strongly to the need for fluidity in infrastructure. Yes, there will be rapid contractions just as often as escalations in demand, but companies can’t just stop investing. If they do, they risk losing their competitive advantage. Likewise, vendors that can’t match this fluidity in the solutions they offer will fall behind,” said Hammond.
For many businesses, local data centre access is a critical consideration. Not only do they want the data held onshore with low-latency connectivity, there’s a degree of psychological comfort in knowing where the data is held and having control over the assets.
Every six months, Emerson Network Power releases its Market Pulse survey, examining infrastructure project. The latest report can be found athttp://www.emersonnetworkpower-partner.com/default.aspx?ArticleID=10830.

BBC NEWS | Health | Energy drinks 'make you sleepy'

Having a high sugar drink to boost energy can actually make people more sleepy, a study suggests.
Loughborough University researchers say the sugar rush gives a short respite.
But after an hour, people who had such drinks had slower reactions and more lapses in concentration than those who had a no-sugar, no caffeine drink.
Sleep experts say energy drinks help athletes, but sleepy drivers or others needing a boost should have a small amount of caffeine - and a short nap.
 We live in a tired society
Dr Neil Stanley, British Sleep Society
In the Loughborough study, published in the Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental journal, 10 adults were studied to see what effect different drinks had on their wakefulness.
They had all volunteered to restrict their sleep to five hours on the day before participating in the trial.
An hour after eating a light lunch they were given either an energy drink containing 42g of sugar and 30 milligrams of caffeine, or an identically tasting zero-sugar drink.
They then performed a monotonous 90-minute test during the afternoon "dip" to assess their sleepiness and ability to concentrate.
The researchers found that for the first 30 minutes there was no difference in the reaction times or error rates.
But 50 minutes after consuming the drinks, the performance of those who had had the energy drink started to slip, and they became significantly sleepier.
'Have a cat nap'
Professor Jim Horne, who runs the Sleep Research Centre at the University of Loughborough. said: "A 'sugar rush' is not very effective in combating sleepiness - so avoid soft drinks that contain lots of sugar but little or no caffeine.
"A much better way to combat sleepiness is to have a drink that contains more useful amounts of caffeine and combine this with a short nap."
Professor Horne said people with low blood sugar would feel better after having an energy drink.
But he added: "Whilst there is good evidence that sugar intake can boost physical energy, there is little support for it having any benefits for a sleepy brain."
Drivers who are feeling sleepy are advised to take precisely those measures to help them reach their destination.
But Dr Neil Stanley of the British Sleep Society said the only thing your body needs when you start to feel tired is sleep.
"We live in a tired society - which is why these drinks exist."
But he added: "Energy drinks boost blood sugar. They are good for athletes. But if you're sitting still, you're not doing anything with that energy."
Dr Stanley said drivers and others who were feeling tired should turn to caffeine if they could not get the sleep their body wanted.
"As the Highway Code recommends, you should have a couple of caffeine drinks and a cat nap."
"But when you come down, you'll be back to where you were."

The Top-Three Foreign Retirement Destinations - Daily Gains Letter


Retiring doesn’t mean staying put, living frugally, and stretching your investing dollar. If you’re more adventurous or not tied down geographically, there is an almost endless number of foreign destinations to consider retiring to. That said, some foreign countries are more suited to retirement than others.
While warmer climes, cheaper taxes, and cultural discoveries are major reasons why some Americans have chosen to retire outside the U.S., for many, the point of packing up and moving away after retirement is about finding a destination that offers something that’s become increasingly difficult to find here in America—a good quality of life for a reasonable price.
With the state of the economy, more and more Americans are looking elsewhere to park their retirement dollars—and for good reason. A recent report shows that Americans’ confidence level in their ability to retire comfortable is at an historic low.
Just 14% are “very confident” they will have enough money to live comfortably when they retire; on the other end of the scale, 23% say they are “not at all confident.” (Source: “The 2012 Retirement Confidence Survey; Job Insecurity, Debt Weight on Retirement Confidence, Savings,” Employee Benefit Research Institute, March 2012.)
American baby boomers nearing retirement could also be looking outside the borders. The same report shows that 60% of workers report that the total value of their savings and investments (excluding primary home and defined benefits plan) is less than $25,000. Almost 20% say they are “not at all confident” that they have done a good job preparing for retirement.
Roughly 60% of middle-class retirees will likely run out of money if they maintain their pre-retirement lifestyle and don’t cut spending by at least 24%. Unfortunately, it’s difficult for many to curb their spending and cut back on lifestyle choices.
Fortunately, there are some foreign destinations where those wanting to retire with limited income can lead very comfortable lives. There are countries where Americans can save thousands of dollars on world-class health care provided by English-speaking, U.S.-trained doctors. There are places where retirees can also find beachfront condos for under $100,000 and places to live for less than $1,000 a month (excluding rent). (Source: “The World’s Top Retirement Havens in 2013,” International Living, December 14, 2012.)
Granted, everyone has different priorities. For you, maybe warm climates aren’t important, but inexpensive health care is. Everyone needs to decide what the most important factors for moving are to determine any potential pitfalls or deal-breakers.
So, without further ado, here are the top-three foreign retirement destinations:
1. Ecuador
Thanks to the low cost of living, warm climate, and cheap property prices, Ecuador has ranked as the top foreign retirement destination for North Americans for the fifth consecutive year (2008–2012).
While its inexpensive real estate and warm equatorial climate are major draws to retiring in Ecuador, the real attraction is being able to retire well on a limited retirement budget, or even on a Social Security check alone.
Ecuador is home to modern hospitals, clinics, and well-trained physicians. All retirees are eligible to participate in the country’s Social Security healthcare system. And out-of-pocket expenses for doctor’s visits, procedures, and drugs are a fraction of what you would pay in the U.S.
2. Panama
A close second, Panama is home to year-round sunshine and warm weather; a low cost of living (even lower outside Panama City); and a tax system that’s geared toward foreigners—it’s possible for retirees to live and do business in Panama 100% tax-free.
Through a series of presidential decrees beginning in May 2012, Panama’s Pensionado Program makes it easier for citizens of the United States and other countries to obtain permanent residency status. While Panama’s official currency is called the “balboa,” it’s actually just the U.S dollar under a different name.
Panama also wins praise for its retiree discounts on medicines, entertainment, and restaurants, and its friendly people. Panama City is even home to the country’s new John Hopkins Hospital.
3. Malaysia
Malaysia may be further away, but it has similar draws, including a tropical climate, low cost of living, and cheap rent. Malaysia has a stable government and economy, and a rich cultural history. Unlike other nations in Asia, in Malaysia, retirees can buy freehold property, land, houses and condominiums.
Malaysia is also home to one of the best healthcare systems in the region. While the healthcare system is divided into public and private sectors, foreigners only have access to the private system. Even the private system is inexpensive compared to what you would pay in the United States.
The Malaysia “My Second Home” program allows foreigners to stay in Malaysia for as long as possible on a multiple-entry social visit pass, with an initial expiry period of 10 years, with the option to renew.
Although the country’s official language is Bahasa Malaysia, or Malay, the predominant language is English. Even the government’s web site is in English.
Thousands of Americans have decided to live their retirement years in another country, perhaps with a more moderate climate, more affordable standard of living, or a closer proximity to family and friends. Many do so year-round, while others spend a few months abroad at a time.
While retiring abroad isn’t for everyone, it is becoming a reality for an increasing number of people. Whatever your reason for wanting to retire outside the United States, it’s important to make careful preparations and understand tax laws, medical care, and residency.

China's cyber spies are stealing more than secrets | The Australian


IN his February 12 State of the Union speech to congress, President Barack Obama declared that American cyber "enemies" were not just stealing identities and hacking into personal and corporate email but also acquiring the ability to hack into the country's civilian systems such as power grids, financial institutions and air traffic control infrastructure.
Then earlier this week, US cyber-security firm Mandiant released an explosive report accusing the Chinese People's Liberation Army of funding and orchestrating an extensive program of cyber-espionage against American firms. Chinese state-backed news outlets immediately labelled the report groundless, but the growing weight of evidence means that Beijing's blunt strategy of denial is becoming less plausible. And Chinese industrial cyber-espionage will soon replace barbs over currency policy as the major economic bug-bear between the two economic giants.
The Mandiant report puts into the public space what government agencies, cyber-security firms and private companies already acknowledge readily but in private: China has become the leading perpetrator of industrial theft through malicious cyber activities originating from the country. The report goes way further than the broad-based accusations that are usually levelled against Chinese entities.
For a start, it traces the attacks to an entity named APT1, a single organisation of operators linked to four large networks in Shanghai, two of which are based in the city's Pudong New Area. Significantly the PLA's Unit 61398 - a secret unit engaging in "Computer Network Operations" for the military - is also located in the same group of buildings from which APT1's cyber-activity originates. Unit 61398 reports to the PLA General Staff Department, which in turn reports directly to the Central Military Commission, the country's peak decision-making body on military matters. If so, it is certain that China's top civilian leaders in the Standing Committee of the politburo would have intimate knowledge of the activities of Unit 61398.
Moreover, quantity matters. The Mandiant report indicates that hundreds of terabytes of data have been stolen by Unit 61398 from at least 141 American corporations spread across 20 sectors. Significantly, these sectors correspond to those that have been labelled "strategic" and "important" to current and future Chinese "comprehensive national power" by the country's leaders. For example, the four most targeted commercial sectors by Unit 61398 are information technology, aerospace, satellites and telecommunications, and scientific research.
The US administration has been reluctant to openly "name and shame" China as the major perpetrator of industrial cyber-espionage for fear of damaging an already fraught relationship between the two countries. There are a number of reasons to believe that this is about to change.
First, US firms are no longer fearful that their access to the Chinese market would be restricted if they make a fuss and are beginning to urge the government to champion the cause. The difference now is that the scale, sophistication and frequency of these cyber-espionage activities originating from China have become impossible to ignore.
American industry groups and intelligence agencies are beginning to quantify the collective value of lost intellectual property as possibly being in the hundreds of billions of dollars.
Second, it is well known that newly appointed Secretary of State John Kerry has a strong interest in this issue. In February last year, and as chairman of the Senate foreign relations committee, Kerry openly announced that he would raise the issue of Chinese trade theft with Xi Jinping on the latter's first visit to the US as the putative president. Significantly, Kerry deliberately made a broader issue intellectual property theft by declaring that Chinese cyber-activity against US firms was an "egregious, palpable demonstration of the practice that we are deeply concerned about".
Finally, putting pressure on Beijing over its cyber activities plays nicely into the Obama administration's aim to use economic statecraft to further its leadership and influence in the region over China. In taking up the issue of industrial cyber-espionage against China, Obama will find growing support from countries such as Japan, South Korea, Singapore, India and Australia.
Governments spying on each other is fair game, but government entities stealing information from private firms in foreign countries is a different thing altogether. At stake is billions of dollars of intellectual property. More than that, it is about the world's second-largest economy not playing by the rules that has ensured its rise.

In politics, as in life, you make your own luck | The Australian


AT the risk of stealing Julia Gillard's thunder, there is only one poll that really counts, but all polls count for something, and today's Newspoll matters more than most. It confirms a dismal trend for Labor suggesting that leadership speculation will continue, and that the party's pain has barely just begun.
We offer no advice to the Labor caucus on the wisdom of changing leaders at this late stage in the electoral cycle, except to note again that almost all the problems with which the Prime Minister now grapples had their origins on Kevin Rudd's watch. It was not, however, Mr Rudd's decision to set the election date eight months ahead of time, a highly unconventional move for which Ms Gillard appears to be paying the price. More people have locked in their votes, making a recovery harder.
Barring the unexpected, any change in leadership will be little more than a footnote in political history, a few paragraphs in the chapter on Labor's crisis of identity at the start of the 21st century. Indeed, Labor's problems began long before that. They could never be fixed in three years, but few would have predicted that Ms Gillard's erratic political judgment might actually make things worse.
A leader with a surer touch would not have signed a deal with the Greens in 2010. Such a leader would have disowned Craig Thomson at the first hint of impropriety; ditto for former Speaker Peter Slipper, who would not have been Speaker in the first place. Voters have a low tolerance for sleaze. An adroit leader would not have ruled out a carbon tax and then introduced one. Either decision could have been defended separately but together they break the precious bond of trust. An accomplished politician would not have sued for peace with the mining companies; Wayne Swan would have been obliged to undertake greater due diligence, so that the government would not be saddled with a useless tax that eroded Labor's hard-won reputation for economic reform. A deft leader would not have pledged, time and again, that the budget would return to surplus in 2013 knowing that, short of breaking the shells one by one and pouring them yourself, there was no surer way to go into an election wiping egg off your face.
A leader with a better sense of Labor's history and its place in the modern world would have avoided standing shoulder to shoulder with comrades at the Australian Workers Union last week. It would have dawned on such a leader that unions today are a boutique product. Labor must talk to middle Australia, to the people who do not know the tune, let alone the words, to Solidarity Forever and were not hanging on their seats waiting for the outcome of the Copenhagen climate change summit. Labor's future will be as a social democratic party, the descriptor Ms Gillard rejected last week. It must become a party that recognises that government is not the answer to every question, that a healthy private sector is the driver of prosperity, and that individual responsibility strengthens the fabric of society. The circumstances of minority government and a volatile world economy do not change this cold, hard truth: different choices from those made by Ms Gillard would have ensured that her successor, now or after the election, did not have to start from scratch.

The How-To Guide for LinkedIn - Computerworld


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The How-To Guide for LinkedIn

By Kristin Burnham
February 21, 2013 03:25 PM ET
CIO - LinkedIn Features
LinkedIn's redesigned Jobs page sports a new look and a handful of updated features, making it easier for you to find the perfect job.
LinkedIn's updated 'People You May Know' feature helps you expand your network by letting you sort contacts by company, college and more.
LinkedIn is re-launching CardMunch, an iPhone app that scans business cards and turns them into contacts you can connect with on LinkedIn. Heres how it works, along with some new features.
LinkedIn unveils its redesigned profile page that includes a handful of new features. Here's a sneak peek at what you can expect when LinkedIn switches your profile in the upcoming months.
LinkedIn's newest feature, Endorsements, lets you highlight the skills you're known for. Here's how it works, plus four expert tips for making the most of it.
As LinkedIn continues to focus on its mobile offering, the professional social network has announced three updates to its site and mobile app: real-time notifications, Company Pages and a handful of new languages available to iPad users.
LinkedIn has rolled out a number of updates to its website, including a cleaner and easier-to-navigate homepage and new features for LinkedIn Today. Here's what you need to know.
Reports last week revealed that LinkedIn collects meeting information --including phone numbers and sensitive meeting notes -- if you turn on the iOS app's calendar feature. LinkedIn sets the record straight, making three important clarifications.
How well do you know LinkedIn? Maybe not as well as you think. Here's a look at five features and tools -- from listening to headlines to hiding your identity -- that can save you time, expand your network and give you perspective on your connections.
LinkedIn released a new plug-in that lets you apply for jobs with your LinkedIn profile by simply clicking a button.
LinkedIn's new feature for browsers and iPhones, "SpeechIn," uses text-to-speech to read you the day's top news headlines -- a great feature for people on the go, with some tweaks.
LinkedIn rolls out a new update to its iPhone app that simplifies the news browsing experience with the flick of a finger.
LinkedIn's feed of member status updates and Twitter updates deliver big potential benefits for job seekers. Here's how you can use the tool to land a job others may not know about.
LinkedIn's newest product, announced Thursday, aims to be your go-to source for daily industry news. Here's a look at the benefits and some quick tips on how to customize it.
For everything from finding connections at specific companies to applying for a job that meets all your criteria, here's how you can get the most form LinkedIn's people, company and job search capabilities. Registration required.
LinkedIn is overhauling its Account Settings page this week. Here's a sneak peek at the new features and design.
How much of your profile have you made public? Can others see that you've viewed their profile? If you're unsure of these answers, it's time to revisit these five privacy settings.
LinkedIn showcases experimental applications and projects via its new site LinkedIn Labs, where users can get their hands on new features and help determine their fate. Here's a rundown of four apps that are currently live.
The professional social network keeps pace with Facebook and Twitter by announcing a product that streams news and updates from contacts. Take a visual tour of the significant new look -- and benefits.
LinkedIn's newest tweak rolls out three changes that will benefit hiring managers and job seekers.
LinkedIn's Groups pages just got a facelift. Here's a look at the new, more interactive options and what they can do for you.
LinkedIn announces a new feature that lets you keep track of key developments at companies you like. Here's how to use it and how to manage your settings.
LinkedIn's Answers feature can help you showcase your expertise and connect you with people that hold similar interests, but use it with caution, experts say.
LinkedIn unveils changes to how you can share information on the site, emulating functionality from Twitter and Facebook. Here's what you need to know about LinkedIn's new updates.
As potential employers or recruiters peruse your work experience on LinkedIn, recommendations from past and present colleagues can be one of the most helpful features to help communicate your value. Here are five tips for doing the most good for yourself with LinkedIn recommendations.
Since LinkedIn launched its application platform, the social network for professionals must carefully vet what technologies get added to the site, ensuring that they honor users' privacy while bolstering productivity.
BlackBerry-maker Research In Motion (RIM) and business-social-networking service LinkedIn today showed off a brand new LinkedIn mobile application for BlackBerry smartphones at RIM's second-annual BlackBerry Developer Conference in San Francisco.
LinkedIn How-Tos
How you handle your last days at a company can cast a lasting impression on your professional reputation. Here are the dos and don'ts of leaving, plus tips for tying up loose ends on LinkedIn.
LinkedIn's redesigned Alumni tool helps you find contacts from college and gives you insights into the companies they work for, the fields they work in and where they live. Here's how you can use the tool to help find an MBA program or land that dream job.
Whether your New Year's resolution is to land that promotion, ask for a raise or find your dream job, here's how you can take charge and make it a reality.
Think you can't get hired in December? Think again. Here are four ways you can take advantage of the holiday season to hone your networking skills and land the perfect job.
To keep your LinkedIn Company Page engaging, you need good content. But what do you do when resources are slim? Here's a look at four types of content--that you may not realize you already have--that are perfect for LinkedIn.
LinkedIn's newest feature, Endorsements, lets you highlight the skills you're known for. Here's how it works, plus four expert tips for making the most of it.
You may have landed a new job, but your work on LinkedIn isn't done. Here are five things you need to do before day one.
LinkedIn's new 'Targeted Status Updates' lets you deliver relevant content to the right followers. Here's what company administrators need to know.
LinkedIn is investigating claims that more than 6 million user passwords were compromised. Here are step-by-step instructions for changing your account password.
A LinkedIn study shows that only 11 percent of respondents accomplish the tasks on their to-do lists. Here are five tips for making and adhering to your tasks.
Managing interns -- plus your own workload -- can be tricky. Here are five expert tips from LinkedIn to help you both make the most of the partnership.
LinkedIn's newest study reveals that Americans are the most anxious workers in the world when it comes to negotiating in the workplace. These seven expert tips will help you conquer that fear and get what you want.
If you're visiting LinkedIn from open WiFi hotspots, your security could be at risk. Here's how to take advantage of a new LinkedIn feature to enable secure browsing to ensure your information remains safe.
LinkedIn's social ads, which automatically opt you in, may use your name and photo to promote brands that you follow. Here are step-by-step instructions for how you can opt-out.
LinkedIn reveals its list of the most overused words of 2012 and offers five expert tips for polishing for the New Year.
With more than 1 million LinkedIn Groups around, finding the one that best suits your needs can be quite a challenge. But now, with LinkedIn's new Groups Statistics dashboard, you have all the help you need to make an informed decision. Here's what you need to know.
New research from LinkedIn finds that women aren't reaching their full potential by seeking out or becoming a mentor. Here's a look at why, plus tips for how you can find and initiate a fruitful relationship.
From sprucing up your profile to branding yourself as an expert, here's how you can better use the professional social network to set you on the path to success.
LinkedIn released a new plug-in that lets you apply for jobs with your LinkedIn profile by simply clicking a button.
LinkedIn's new feature for browsers and iPhones, "SpeechIn," uses text-to-speech to read you the day's top news headlines -- a great feature for people on the go, with some tweaks.
LinkedIn's feed of member status updates and Twitter updates deliver big potential benefits for job seekers. Here's how you can use the tool to land a job others may not know about.
Using a feature called Active Views, Microsoft Hotmail users can send LinkedIn connection requests and follow companies without leaving their e-mail inbox.
For everything from finding connections at specific companies to applying for a job that meets all your criteria, here's how you can get the most form LinkedIn's people, company and job search capabilities. Registration required.
LinkedIn's new beta feature gives you the low-down on job skills -- whether one is trending up or down, related job postings and geographic hotspots where your expertise can best be leveraged. Here's what you need to know about LinkedIn Skills.
With more than 80 million users worldwide, LinkedIn has established itself as the premier social networking site for professionals. If you're job searching, looking to broaden your network or hunting for new partnerships, these 10 tips and tricks will propel you toward success.
Standing out among LinkedIn's 50 million members can be a challenge. Here are five simple tips to make your profile more memorable and expand your network.
Are you a LinkedIn "buzzword" abuser? Do you still use only text and images in your profile to describe yourself and your employment history? If so, these three simple tips can refresh and revamp that boring profile and help set you apart from the rest of the pack.
LinkedIn is revamping its poll feature to include a more user-friendly interface, increased sharing options and better analytics. Here's what you need to know.
Customization and variety are key to making your LinkedIn profile stand out and get you recognized by recruiters. Check out these four new profile sections that do just that.
A new LinkedIn beta feature allows you to sync the social networking site with Microsoft Outlook, giving you more transparency to your contacts and making it easier to grow your network.
LinkedIn announced a new feature intended to give you more control over how you present your profile. Now, instead of adhering to LinkedIn's templated format, you can arrange the pieces of your profile (such as your summary, experience and recommendations) however you see fit. Here's how it works.
Located about halfway down your LinkedIn homepage on the right-hand side is a box-"Who's Viewed My Profile"-that gives you two statistics: how many times your profile has been viewed in the last seven days and how many times you have appeared in search results in the last seven days. Here's advice on how and why to keep an eye on who is checking out your LinkedIn profile.
An underused-yet valuable-feature on LinkedIn is the "Network Updates" element. The Network Updates box, located on your homepage below your Inbox updates, is the area that you can use as your "professional billboard," using 140 characters or less. Want to stay top of mind with your LinkedIn connections? This tool, when used effectively, helps you do just that.
LinkedIn's Answers feature can help you showcase your expertise and connect you with people that hold similar interests, but use it with caution, experts say.
LinkedIn announces a new feature that lets you keep track of key developments at companies you like. Here's how to use it and how to manage your settings.
A new LinkedIn feature bridges the gap between your LinkedIn connections and your Twitter followers. Here are step-by-step instructions for getting started.
If you're in the market for a new job, looking to gain exposure in your industry or searching for new clients, ranking high on LinkedIn search results is essential. These three simple tips will help keep you top of mind and at the top of search results.
LinkedIn Apps
LinkedIn is re-launching CardMunch, an iPhone app that scans business cards and turns them into contacts you can connect with on LinkedIn. Heres how it works, along with some new features.
LinkedIn maybe No. 1 when it comes to professional social networking, but your quest to connect doesn't need to stop there. Here's a look at 10 social networks for professionals that offer a variety of features such as Facebook integration, career advice, resume critiques and more.
Using a feature called Active Views, Microsoft Hotmail users can send LinkedIn connection requests and follow companies without leaving their e-mail inbox.
LinkedIn is revamping its poll feature to include a more user-friendly interface, increased sharing options and better analytics. Here's what you need to know.
Looking to enhance your LinkedIn profile? LinkedIn's applications add another dimension to your professional persona and can give hiring managers a better peek into your 9 to 5 life.
LinkedIn Etiquette
How many LinkedIn requests do you get? Do you accept all of them? Here's why quality should trump quantity.
If you're serious about connecting with someone on LinkedIn, skip the boilerplate invite. Instead, follow these three steps to make connections effectively.
When it comes to LinkedIn connections, some people believe more is better, creating huge networking circles. But that approach has prompted debate, with even some people inside LinkedIn saying that's a risky strategy. Here are three good reasons to beware of having too many LinkedIn connections.
Improve your social networking etiquette IQ with our expert advice on some sticky situations you see on LinkedIn and other social networking sites. How can you politely decline friend or connection requests? Effectively introduce yourself to someone who doesn't know you well? Thoughtfully connect two contacts? We've got answers.
Knowing how to interact with your connections on the professional social network isn't always as straightforward as it seems. Here are five cardinal rules that you should follow.
LinkedIn for Job Search
You may have landed a new job, but your work on LinkedIn isn't done. Here are five things you need to do before day one.
If you're looking for a new job, LinkedIn's three paid accounts offer you additional job-search-specific features. Before you dole out the dough, here's what you need to know to make an informed decision.
LinkedIn's newest study reveals that Americans are the most anxious workers in the world when it comes to negotiating in the workplace. These seven expert tips will help you conquer that fear and get what you want.
Is your job search lagging? Not seeing the results you'd like? Check out these ten expert tips from CIO.com's Kristin Burnham to enhance your search.
LinkedIn's redesigned Alumni tool helps you find contacts from college and gives you insights into the companies they work for, the fields they work in and where they live. Here's how you can use the tool to help find an MBA program or land that dream job.
Think you can't get hired in December? Think again. Here are four ways you can take advantage of the holiday season to hone your networking skills and land the perfect job.
LinkedIn's redesigned Jobs page sports a new look and a handful of updated features, making it easier for you to find the perfect job.
Bucking conventional career wisdom, LinkedIn says volunteer work is an important -- yet often overlooked -- component of resumes. To help members showcase their volunteer work, the professional networking site has announced a new profile section where users can list the causes that are important to them.
LinkedIn released a new plug-in that lets you apply for jobs with your LinkedIn profile by simply clicking a button.
LinkedIn's feed of member status updates and Twitter updates deliver big potential benefits for job seekers. Here's how you can use the tool to land a job others may not know about.
LinkedIn's new beta feature gives you the low-down on job skills -- whether one is trending up or down, related job postings and geographic hotspots where your expertise can best be leveraged. Here's what you need to know about LinkedIn Skills.
If you're on the hunt for a job, here are two tips to ensure your profile appears as a match for LinkedIn job posts.
For $20 a month, LinkedIn will move you to the top of the application pile. Is it worth it for you?
Job seekers with robust LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter profiles have better access to job opportunities at growing companies than candidates whose job searches don't include active social networking profiles, according to the results of a new survey.
Job seekers' social networking profiles may do more harm than good in their job searches. Here are seven tips to prevent bad--or incomplete--social networking profiles from turning off a potential employer.
With so many people job hunting now, you've got more competition than ever on LinkedIn. So how do you make your LinkedIn profile work best for you? Here are some practical tips for standing out from the crowd and reaching potential employers.
Company profile pages on LinkedIn can help you tune into a company's comings and goings, executive relationships and key business facts. Here's how to search and use LinkedIn Company Profiles to your best advantage.
LinkedIn Analysis
LinkedIn surveyed more than 8,000 professionals to find out what they wanted to be when they grew up. Here's a look at the results, plus tips for how you can use LinkedIn to get the job you always wanted, because it's never too late to dream.
LinkedIn names the top workplace trends and items headed for obsolescence--and also lists what's becoming mainstream. Here's a look at those items, plus three tips for ensuring you don't go the way of the fax machine.
What sets entrepreneurs apart and where do they come from? LinkedIn scoured more than 120 million profiles to paint the picture of today's entrepreneur. Here's what they found.
It's the battle of the network sexes. LinkedIn pits the women against the men to find out who's better at networking professionally online. Here's what they found.
Maybe you won't ever have to worry about looking presidential -- but perhaps you will wonder if a Rose by another name would sound more like a CEO.
LinkedIn is overhauling its Account Settings page this week. Here's a sneak peek at the new features and design.
Social networking service LinkedIn is free, but if you choose to upgrade to a paid account, you have access to additional features. Not sure what you get from the paid level of membership to LinkedIn? Here's the lowdown on four advantages.
When it comes to LinkedIn connections, some people believe more is better, creating huge networking circles. But that approach has prompted debate, with even some people inside LinkedIn saying that's a risky strategy. Here are three good reasons to beware of having too many LinkedIn connections.
You've signed up for LinkedIn, because everyone says it's the primary business social network. But to whom should you connect? Your strategy should differ from your approach to Facebook.
Are mistakes on your LinkedIn profile costing you possible job opportunities? Check out this expert advice on LinkedIn profile pitfalls.
LinkedIn open networkers, or LIONs, accept almost all LinkedIn connection requests and introduce strangers out of good will. Here's a look at this controversial group and its approximately 16,000 members who'd like to be known as the saints of social networking, but are sometimes called spammers.
LinkedIn has imposed new restrictions on the number of connections any one person can have, say members of the LinkedIn open networkers, a controversial group that accepts almost all LinkedIn connection requests. The group appears to be walking an increasingly fine line with the social network.
Despite the spotlight on Facebook and its massive user base, the social network's more professional competitor, LinkedIn, is poised for profitability and more immediate financial success. Analysts also say investors see revenue potential for LinkedIn that extends beyond advertising.
Kristin Burnham covers Consumer Technology, SaaS, Social Networking and Web 2.0 for CIO.com. Follow Kristin on Twitter @kmburnham. Follow everything from CIO.com on Twitter @CIOonline. Email Kristin at kburnham@cio.com.
Read more about consumer in CIO's Consumer Drilldown.
Originally published on www.cio.comClick here to read the original story.
This story is reprinted from CIO.com, an online resource for information executives. Story Copyright CXO Media Inc., 2012. All rights reserved.
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